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20131105
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Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
, a new book looks at his little known legacy as a ground- breaking foreign-policy president. >> lincoln had to deal with a series of crises over the course of his presidency from france, from britain, from spain, even russian ships showed up off the atlantic coast. >> ifill: those are just some of the stories we're covering on tonight's "pbs newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: israel has launched new air strikes into syria. u.s. security officials say the attack came after nightfall, in the syrian port city of latakia after nightfall. the target was said to be russian-made, surface-to-ai
of the region, the last measure of american foreign policy should be how it is received by the house. if there were a price for most irresponsible foreign policy, it would be surely be awarded to saudi arabia. it is the nation most responsible for the rise of islamic radicalism and militancy across the world. over the past four decades, the kingdoms immense oil wealth has been used to underwrite the export of an extreme intolerant and violent version of islam. go anywhere in the world from germany to indonesia and you will find islamic centers flush with saudi money spouting intolerance and hate. a top treasury official said -- >> if i could snap my fingers and cut off funding from one country, it would be saudi arabia. >> hillary clinton confirmed that saudi arabia remained a critical financial base for terrorism. she also said that there was only limited action to stop flow of funds from taliban and other such terrorists groups. saudi arabia was one of three countries in the world to recognize and support the taliban-led government in afghanistan until the 9/11 attacks. it is also
american foreign policy. plus the influence of rock legend lou reed and his impact on the culture from the 60s to today. >> hello, i'm libby casey. tonight on inside story we'll take a walk on the wild side and look at the life and legacy of iconic rocker lou reed who died at the age of 71. first we'll focus on american spying, specifically spying on friends, and our friends are not happy. tonight you can add spain to the list of countries that are demanding answers. the newest details emerge in this spanish newspaper "el mundo" reporting that phone calls from surveye survei. over the weekend came news that the nsa has been monitoring calls from german chancellor angela merkel as far back a as 2002. >> i think the most important thing is to find a basis for the future on which we can operate, and as i said today trust needs to be rebuilt which implies that trust has been severely shaken, and the members of the european union share these concerns today. true change is necessary. >> reporter: when barack obama was running for president in 2008 he went to german and pledged a new era of u
. >> essentially it comes down to two facts about u.s. foreign policy in the middle east - one, the u.s. is committed to maintaining the peace treaty between egypt and israel. it cannot end a relationship with egypt in order to maintain the peace treaty. that is where you see some of the material, some of the military parts that are being given to the military to help preserve the security in the sinai peninsula. there's the matter of enhancing the u.s.'s stature across the great e-middle east. it would -- greater middle east. it would not do for the barack obama situation to cut off all ties with a country with whom it has had a longstanding political relationship. one of points that john kerry is making whilst in cairo is that the interim government, backed by the military, can't exist inperpetuaty, it needs to get on with establishing elections for a democratic-elected parliament and needs to take the steps sooner rather than later. >> let's talk about the visit to cairo. we didn't know about it until he landed, which makes you think iraq, afghanistan - dangerous places. what are t
.s. can reconcile the democracy in egypt. >> it comes down to two facts about u.s. foreign policy in the middle east. >> one the u.s. is committed to maintaining the peace treaty between egypt and israel and it can simply not end a relationship with egypt in order to maintain that peace treaty. that is where you see the material or the military parts that are still being given to the military to help preserve the security in the sinai peninsula, for example. there is also the matter of trying to enhance the u.s.' stature across the middle east. it would not due for the obama administration to cut off all ties with the country with who it's had a long standing political and military relationship because of these political problems. >> with that said one. points secon secretary kerry isg while he is in cairo, this interm government cannot exist in perpetuity. it needs to get on with the business of constitutional reforms and establishing elections for a new democratically elected president and parliament. and it need to take on has to steps much soonerrather than later. >> let's tal
hatred and extremism throughout the region. but foreign policy is not a zero-sum game. if we can find ways to resolve disputes peacefully, we are wise to explore them. engagement is not appeasement, nor is it containment. we know what those are, we know where they lead, and we will not pursue them. and president obama has repeatedly made clear that words are not enough. action must match words. we understand why this is so important to so many people. because we've all been to yad vashem. earlier this year, i had the opportunity to revisit yad vashem. i had been there before, but this time was special for, because i brought my son, ziller, with me. i wanted him to see the harsh realities of the depths of evil, and the beautiful tribute to the victims of the past. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2013] ways demand commitment, sacrifice, and courage. tolerance, equality, and justice around the globe. and it demands that we remember the timeless questions of rabbi hillel, "if i am not for myself, who will be for me
allegations threaten to disrupt foreign policy with u.s. allies. >> i think the revelations from snowden and the secrets revealed are doing significant damage to our bilateral relationships with germany, with mexico, with the other countries to where the suggestion is that we've listened in. i think we have repair work to do and hard questions to ask of the n.s.a. about what's really happening in this program. >> congressman peter king, the chairman of the house homeland security committee said america should stop apologizing. >> the reality is the n.s.a. has saved thousands of lives in the united states, france and germany and throughout europe. the french is someone to talk. they have carried out spying operations against the united states, both the government and industry. as far as germany, that's where the hamburg blot began which started 9/11. the french and germans and other european countries, we are not doing this for the fun of it. >> former vice president dick cheney agrees the u.s. should remain cautious. >> the overall capabilities are important and need to be preserved. >>
regimes that are in fact very difficult for the united states in foreign policy. so there are many different interrelations here that unfortunately seem to be getting more serious by the day and we have a panel that i think is certainly one of the best panels one could possibly put together to talk about this. the real top experts in the united states on this subject. our first panelist is spike bowman who is a specialist in national security law and policy. most recently he served as the deputy of the national counterintelligence executive. he served before that is the senior research fellow at the national defense university and prior to that he was in the senior executive service federal bureau of investigation is the senior counsel for national security law and is director of the intelligence issues group at the national security branch. please join me in welcoming spike bowman. [applause] >> thank you, john. when we think of organized crime i think most of us incorporated about the east coast of the united states when we look at the crime families and things like that and we t
in those shadows, but his insights have helped shape the key foreign policy decisions of the last three presidents. the first thing we asked morell about was the last thing he did at the c.i.a.: taking part in the damage assessment on edward snowden, the n.s.a. contractor who leaked classified documents about america's secret electronic surveillance programs. >> mike morell: i do not believe he was a whistleblower. i do not believe he is a hero. i think he has betrayed his country. >> miller: how serious a hit is that to national security? >> morell: i think this is the most serious leak-- the most serious compromise of classified information in the history of the u.s. intelligence community. >> miller: because of the amount of it? or the type? >> morell: the amount and the type. >> miller: but of the hundreds of pages of n.s.a. documents that snowden has leaked, morell pointed to one in particular that has caused a great deal of damage to u.s. intelligence. it's a copy of the top secret document the c.i.a. calls its" black budget." what value would that have to an adversary? >> morell:
point out, nsa situation obviously a huge domestic and foreign policy issue, health care is his signature achievement to this point in his presidency. you would think he would be more in the loop is a way of saying it than he has been. >> how much of this shock that's being expressed by the allies just simply to try to get some leverage with the u.s. because everyone knew this was going on and they do it to us and we do it to them. the world of spying. >> you have to express anger this is going on. if you suspected or knew it was going on. they can use it effectively for leverage. the question now is whether or not united states is going to enter into new nonspying agreements with countries they have long resisted entering these agreements with. so whether it's the french or germans, you know, they now have a good deal of leverage to try to negotiate these pacts if they so choose. it's quite possible one result is there will be more nonspying agreements with european allies than there were before. >> i would bet on germany and not on france, just saying. mark mazzetti and chris
. this is beyond obama care. this is the whole economy and our foreign policy. >> but if there is no republican leader per se and there isn't. it's a divided party. who is going to tie it together? who is going to be the one to present it to the measure people? it can't be job boehner. nobody knows him, all right? it can't be him. you have got cruise. you have got rubio. you have got christie. christie is a governor though. i don't think is he going to do it. you have got rand paul. it's very hard to get a cohesive message out to the american people when you don't have a messenger. >> but i think what they can do legislatively is they can say, look, there is so much chaos on some levels with what they're claiming their policies are going to do that, frankly, our role is going to be to block what they are trying to do. an extension of obama care. they have got to do that. >> didn't work -- >> -- no, that didn't work, bill, on other things that obama tried. he tried to pivot today back to carbon and the green economy. if he tries any more stuff on that, the republicans have got to say, look, they
on foreign policy he was pretty good, terrible on domestic policy. and so i, too, had to fight that public image. and i came out of it quite conflicted. >> host: nicole is in michigan city indiana and nicole, your are on booktv with kitty kelley. >> caller: thank you, ms. kelly. i'm really enjoying the program and i just admire you and i love your approach to writing unauthorized biographies. i'm an aspiring writer myself and i would like to know, how do you start your day, the whole process and starting her books. are you a morning ride, evening writer, what is your process? >> host: what kind of books are you writing? >> caller: well, it's a book on how to get married, because there's a lot of single women, how to get married. [laughter] >> guest: that would be a best seller. >> caller: that's what i'm hoping. and i look at successful women also and how they met their spouses. that i talk to women every day that are in marriages and say, no, how did you major husband. so i'm doing research and also drawing upon my own experience. so how do you start your writing day in which the process
comment on our foreign policy by former vice president dick cheney. listen to this. >> i think our friend no longer count on us, no longer trust us and our adversaries don't fear us. that is the cornerstone and base of u.s. ability and influence. if we're not heavily involved there, if we turned our back on the region, if we have a president who believes we overreacted to the terrorism attacks on 9/11, i think the saudis, the emiratis, egyptians, many in that part of the world no longer have confidence in the united states. martha: does this president lack confidence or even respect to some extent from some of these world leaders and is that part of the reason that we're seeing this kind of outrage about all this? >> by all accounts president obama does not have close personal relationships with foreign leaders the way reagan did with thatcher or bill clinton did with tony blair or president bush with angela merkel for that matter or with sarkozy. in the middle east he had very inconsistent policy for instance with syria. he basically told france by all accounts that we were going to atta
the domain of foreign policy, whether the central government is on board because the prime minister of pakistan is going to be briefed by his cabinet in the next few hours and is going to be some sort of outcome from that particular meeting with the prime minister later tonight. >> we will continue to follow that, and thank you. elections turn violent sunday in parts of kosovo and masked men burst in throwing tear gas and smashing ballot boxes and the police were across the city and the first time they are voting in local elections since they declared independence in 2008. when the storm season calms and dangerous exit begins and 50 people are missing after a boat capsized and eight people were rescued and carrying muslims and they are a muslim minority in myanmar and persecuted and 200 people have been killed in violence and hundreds in camps and they tried to flee the country. east of the bay another boat accident killed at least six tourists, a boat capsized and it was over crowded and took on water and sank. the capacity is 150 but there have been more than 200 on board. witness
've abandoned them, as we have done egypt. it's an interesting foreign policy we're witnessing. lieutenant colonel allen west who fights for us, worked for us in washington and now a fox news contributor, thanks so much. >> thanks for having me, brian. >> next up, hey, parents, do your kids love mac and cheese? there is big changes coming and you need to know about it because they're going to eat it anyway. reality show husband bill rancic is running into the studio right now, he'll be in last place of the new york city marathon. wisest kid? we need a new recipe. let us consult the scroll of infinite deliciousness. perfect. [ wisest kid ] campbell's has the recipes kids love. so good! [ wisest kid ] at campbellskitchen.com. [ gong ] m'm! m'm! good! female narrator: the mattress price wars are ending soon the mattress price wars are ending soon at sleep train. we've challenged the manufacturers to offer even lower prices. now it's posturepedic versus beautyrest with big savings of up to $400 off. serta icomfort and tempur-pedic go head-to-head with three years' interest-free financing, plus
formulate an effective foreign and national security policy. we're looking for that. so we're looking for information that helps us -- >>. >> ifill: that's pretty broad though. >> of course it's broad. we're looking for information that help us understand how other countries think and how they plan to operate. and that can make our relationship with them much more affective and productive. >> ifill: is that what european nations are looking for as well? >> i think that european nations it are looking for some supervision and some limits. the nsa sucks in as much information as it does partly because it can. partly because of new information technologies, the internet, wireless, cell phones. and the europeans simply have a political culture that is more sensitive to privacy than in the united states. >> ifill: so they handle their intelligence differently than we would necessarily. >> well, they haven't made much more progress on these kinds of issues among themselves than they have with us. they don't have an eu-wide approach to intelligence. they have their individual member states b
met with egy egypt's foreign minister and didn't extend -- because it's quote policy. kerry is the highest level official to visit since morsey's ou ouster. his trial begins tomorrow. >>> after nsa edward snowden met with a german lawmaker in moscow he reportedly said he is willing to testify. he will go to nogermany as longs that country doesn't send him to the us. he said in a manifesto today that he feels justified in spilling intelligence secrets. the german lawmaker who met edward snowden said the confessed leaker wants to testify in front of congress. >> he stressed that he is ready to come before the german parliament to testify and that he would rather go before the pairliment and put the facts on the table. >> she says he is making his own decisions and is not being manipulated by the russians. >> despite the police state surveillance state we have been turning into. i think he would love to come back some day if the conditions plitly were different. >> nsa chief alexander, the turmoil now giving him second thoughts on whether spying on al lies like german chancello
't just leaders themselves. it's what goes on around them and the policies that they convey to their governments. >> certainly in my time since being in the business of fbi agent since 2004 in this committee i have always found the best way to determine a foreign leader's intentions is to somehow it either get close to a foreign leader or -- of a foreign leader. would that be accurate? >> yes it would. >> how many years you have been in the intelligence, for many years as the something new that the intelligence committee might try to target -- >> it's one of the first things i learned in intel. it's the fundamental given in the intelligence business. leadership intentionintention s not matter what level you are talking about and that could be military leaders as well. >> you believe that the allies have it at any time any type of espionage activity against the united states of america our intelligence services or leaders or otherwise? >> absolutely. >> are you familiar with the story recently from the former french head of the dcr i? are you familiar with that? >> that's the
? >> with foreign leaders i care about our foreign leaders who are our allies, are they talking to my enemies, i want hear it. are they talking to each other about what they're going to tell us or what their policy positions are going to be. i want to hear that. is angela merkel using that fine talking to her intelligence phone deciding what they will and won't share with us? >> haven't we gotten enough information to justify the intrusion? is it the right question, and what is the answer? >> absolutely a fair question and chris, i think this whole debate has changed in a post-9/11 world where we have all this new capability. we are able to do surveillance. there are oversight mechanisms in place, but i think it's time for us to have a public debate about has our government made the balance right. we have members of congress who implement laws who enact laws and if americans don't like it, they need to engage with their congressperson and talk about how should the balance between privacy and civil liberties versus our national security be made. >> i get the sensitivities about american citizenry
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)

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